Curriculum Vitae (CV) Guidelines and Sample

The primary differences between a resume and a curriculum vitae (CV) are length, purpose and content.

While both are used in job applications, a resume and a CV are not always interchangeable.


Resume or CV? What are you applying for?


A Resume in the United States is a competency-based one- or two-page document used as a personal marketing tool. It is:

Intended to showcase one’s skills, education, accomplishments, and work experience to the greatest advantage.


A Curriculum Vitae (CV) means “life story” and provides a summary of one’s experience and skills. Typically, CVs for entry-level candidates are longer than resumes (at least two or three pages). CVs for mid-level candidates who have amassed numerous publications tend to run much longer.


A Curriculum Vitae is:

  • Submitted for jobs in academia, scientific research and medical fields.

  • Credential based, providing a comprehensive (and often lengthy) listing of the following:

  • Education, certifications/licensures, research experience, teaching experience, conferences, presentations, publications, awards and honors, grants received and professional affiliations and memberships.

  • Outside of the US, commonly used interchangeably to mean a resume.


The order of topics in a CV format is flexible; however, the order can depend on the position in which you are applying. A general rule of thumb to follow is…

  • Begin with Teaching Experience for instructor and some faculty positions that emphasize teaching over research

  • Begin with Research Experience for research positions and some faculty positions that emphasize research over teaching experience

  • Being with Professional Experience for positions within industry then followed by research experience (unless it is training/educational position)


 

CV Sample Format


CONTACT INFORMATION

Name

Address

City, State, Country

Telephone and/or cell phone

Email


EDUCATION

List in reverse chronological order and include dates, majors and details of degrees for each institution attended. You can also include other educational programs; specifics about your dissertation; and if applicable, your committee members (if a recent graduate).

Post-Doctoral training

Graduate school or program

Undergraduate degree


EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

List in reverse chronological order (most recent experiences first); include position details and dates.

Professional experience

Teaching experience (Teaching Assistant experience would be listed here)

Research experience (Research Assistant experience would be listed here) Other academic experience (academic advising, tutoring, career services, etc.)

Fellowships & post-docs

Internships


PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS OR SKILLS

Include your certifications and accreditations, as well as the skills you have that are most relevant to the position for which you're applying.

Certifications and accreditations

Computer skills

Language skills (use terms such as “native,” “fluent,” “excellent,” “conversational,” “good” )

Other skills (e.g. laboratory procedures, etc.)


HONORS AND AWARDS

Include any honors or awards you have received that are relevant to the position you want.


RESEARCH AND/OR PUBLICATIONS AND/OR PRESENTATIONS

List any relevant publications, research projects you have worked on or professional presentations you have given. Divide these into subsections. Be sure to use citations specific to your specialty (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, etc.)

Books

Edited volumes

Referred journal articles

Book chapters

Conference proceedings

Encyclopedia entries

Book reviews

Manuscripts in submission (give journal title)

Manuscripts in preparation

Web-based publications

Other publications (This section can include nonacademic publication relevant to your specialty)


INVITED TALKS

These are talks to which you have been invited at other campuses, not your own. Give title, institutional location, and date (year only) at left.


CAMPUS OR DEPARTMENT TALKS

These are talk that you have given in your own department or university. These DO NOT rise to level of invited talks but can be listed here.


CONFERENCE ACTIVITY/PARTICIPATION

Use these subheadings when appropriate.

Conference/symposia organized

Panels organized

Papers presented

Discussant


GRANTS

Give funder, institutional location where you received, and year. Listing the dollar amount can be field specific.


PATENTS

Include the patent number, title and date under the heading ‘Issued Patents’


INSTITUTIONAL SERVICE

If you have completed any administrative work, such as serving on a committee or chairing a department, list this. Include your title if you had one.


SERVICE TO PROFESSION

Include journal manuscript review work with journal titles and leadership of professional organization.


PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS OR AFFILIATIONS

Include the titles of any professional organizations that you are a member of. If you held a position within an organization, list your title.


REFERENCES

Unlike on a resume, you DO list your references. List references virtually. Give name and full title. List title, organization, address, phone and email address. Do not list as Dr. G or Professor G.


ADDITIONAL SECTIONS

Research Interests

Courses Taught/Prepared to Teach

Community Involvement


Tip: Since CV’s include multiple pages include page numbers at the bottom of each page with your Name and page number.



 
 


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